Guidelines for Circulation of Book Depository Materials


Objectives

General Loan Guidelines

Circulation of Materials

Receiving

Weeding

Repair and Conservation


Book Depository Objectives for AAPS:

  • Support the academic mission of AAPS by ensuring equitable, free and timely access to all text materials.
  • Encourage students to be responsible borrowers by maintaining and providing access to a current and accurate record of their account, including obligations for lost or damaged materials.
  • Maintain and secure the inventory.

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General Loan Guidelines:
    Books and other materials are available for loan to all currently enrolled students and all currently employed AAPS faculty and staff.  Preference is given to personnel in the school housing the Depository.
    Loans to other schools or academic facilitators, including student and pre-student teachers, tutors, mentors, home bound teachers and parents, will be made on a “first come, first served” basis as long as copies are available.
    All materials are to be returned promptly upon completion of course work in a usable condition, similar to that of the book when initially loaned.
    Replacement cost for lost or damaged materials is current retail price and will be assessed in writing.
    Students changing schools or leaving the District are responsible for the return of all borrowed materials as part of the checkout process.
    Borrowers failing to comply with these guidelines will be prohibited from receiving additional loans and will be reported to an appropriate administrator.

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Circulation of Materials:

Student Check Out:
    Students are issued sets of specifically numbered primary textbooks for full year and fall specific classes during or as part of the registration process in August of each year.  Books for winter semester classes are issued at the beginning of the second semester upon return of any outstanding texts from a prior semester.
    During the year, students continue to check out such numbered materials as needed or as directed by their instructors.  Books may be checked out or exchanged during class time by arrangement with the instructor or outside of scheduled class time consistent with Depository operating hours.
    Students who drop a class for which they have received a textbook must return that book before borrowing another for an added class.
    Students with an IEP, 504 plan or physical disability requiring additional copies of their assigned texts will be accommodated as soon as all students registered for that course have received the required book(s).
    Students borrowing calculators, available only to registrants in specific math classes, must present a teacher authenticated Request for Loan form at the time of loan.
    There is no limit to the number of items that may be on loan at any given time as long as general loan guidelines are followed.

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Teacher Check Out:
    Teachers may borrow individual copies for their own use at any time. A statement of account will be provided to each non-student borrower annually and loans will be renewed at the borrower’s request.
    Teachers are under the same obligation as students to return all borrowed materials before they leave the school permanently.  Returns include both teacher and student editions and any ancillary materials they might have borrowed from either the Depository or their department libraries.  Replacement cost will be assessed for any materials not returned.  Collection information will be forwarded to an appropriate administrator.
    Teachers may borrow single or multiple sets of books on request, limited only by availability.  Loans are made on a “first come, first served” basis and scheduling conflicts should be resolved at the departmental level.
    Book sets used and stored only in the classroom should be in some way marked to differentiate them from copies issued directly to students.  Teachers are responsible for the return of these sets by the end of each year.  Loans of these sets are not automatically renewable.
    If teachers reissue book sets to students, the teacher must provide the Depository with a list including student name, ID number and the number of the book issued to the student.  Student accounts will be posted from these lists and the lists retained for a year after posting in case verification is necessary.
    Ancillary teaching materials are frequently supplied with newer editions of primary textbooks and are supplied, to some degree, by the publisher as part of the adoption of new materials.  Additional copies or materials may be purchased directly by the department.  These materials, if stored in the Depository, are loaned on a “first come, first served” basis, subject to department instruction.

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Summer School Check Out:
    The Summer School program has access to the contents of the Book Depository in the school where the program is held.
    Sets of books and calculators are checked out to Summer School teachers as requested.  Teachers are responsible for the collection and return of all books at the end of the Summer School session.
    Replacement cost is assessed to the Summer School program for any missing materials.  Reimbursement is handled as a fund transfer. 

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Loan Periods and Returns:
    Loan periods vary by school, class or demand.  Generally, students may keep materials as long as they need them, usually a semester or year for primary texts and four weeks for novels and plays, depending on the school’s procedure, the instructor’s need and demand for the title.
    Items on loan need not be periodically renewed.  All unreturned materials become overdue at the end of classes in June of every year.
    Materials may be returned to the Depository at any time.  This includes items loaned initially to a teacher and currently in the hands of a student.
Students are required to return materials to the Depository after the completion of course work to eliminate obligations and to ensure availability to other borrowers.
    Since book sets are prepared for pick up during Registration, not returning books on time can jeopardize another student’s access to a text and create unrealistic shortages.

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Overdue Materials (Obligations):
    A list of materials issued is provided at Registration when materials are picked up.
    An updated list is mailed home or distributed through English classes mid-year or can be viewed on-line at any time.  A list of materials on loan is available at any time at the Book Depository.
    A combined notice and invoice for all unreturned materials is mailed home before Registration each August.  Obligations must be cleared (i.e. materials returned or paid for), usually by a specific date, before the student is allowed to register for classes in the fall.  Only the return of the specifically numbered book(s) issued to the borrower will clear the loan account.
    Obligations remain on an account until the material is returned or paid for, even after a student leaves the school or District.
    Failure to resolve an obligation may result in a loss of privilege, prohibition from registering, inability to receive a diploma or other administrative action.  Notice of unresolved obligations is forwarded to an appropriate administrator.
    Seniors must clear all obligations by the time they leave campus on their last day of class in order to receive a diploma at graduation.  

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Overdue Fines:
    There are no overdue fines for textbooks.  A fine equal to the retail value of the item is assessed to all borrowers for materials not returned by the end of classes in June.  The fine is removed when the item is returned.  When payment is made, it is critical that the borrower SAVE THE RECEIPT.
Students who leave the District will receive notice by mail at their last known address of costs for materials not returned.

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Lost and Damaged Materials:
    Every year, a considerable number of textbooks are lost throughout the District, most by students leaving the District, but many through personal oversight or carelessness.  Most obligations are for books that simply were not returned on time.
Students are expected to return books to their instructor during final exams or directly to the Book Depository before they leave campus on the last day of final exams in June.  Any books not returned are deemed “lost”.
    Students who know that they have lost a book at any time during the year can pick up an invoice from the Book Depository and pay in cash or by check, money order or certified check at the school’s General Office.  Credit cards are not accepted at this time.
    Damaged books are those returned in an unusable condition as determined by the Book Depository Manager.  This includes books lacking the numbered property label inside every volume.  Without a label it is impossible to properly credit the return.
    When a book is returned damaged, a notice specifying the damage and replacement cost is mailed home immediately.
    Damaged books are retained in the Depository for inspection by the borrower and disposed of after payment is received.
    If a borrower discovers excessive wear or damage to a book, s/he should immediately return it to the Depository for repair or exchange.  Waiting until year-end and claiming “I received it like this.” may not relieve the borrower from responsibility for the damage.

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Refunds:
    Students are eligible to receive a refund for previously paid texts which are subsequently returned or found, provided that they are current enrollees in AAPS or have graduated within the previous year.  The value of books returned or found will be applied to open obligations before a refund is offered.  Students who leave the District forfeit their eligibility for refunds.
    Faculty and staff are eligible for refunds for previous payments as long as they are employed by AAPS.
    Refund vouchers, redeemable in cash at the school’s General Office when accompanied by the original payment receipt, will be mailed to the last address of record when materials are returned or found.  Only one notice is sent.  Responsibility for claiming the refund is that of the student or parent.  In no case will the refund exceed the amount paid.
    Payment for damaged materials is not refundable.

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Receiving:
    Whenever possible, inspect incoming freight shipments to verify the number and condition of cartons.  Note discrepancies on the bill of lading, sign and retain a copy of the bill.
    Sort shipments by source and Purchase Order (PO) number, usually printed on the carton or carton labels.  Each shipment will have a primary carton with the packing list or
invoice attached or will be marked “1 of X”, “1/X” or “Packing Slip Enclosed” or “PSE”.  Open this carton first, remove and retain all enclosed documents.  Match with a copy of the PO, if possible.
    Completely unpack small or multiple title shipments and sort by title.  Sort full cartons in large shipments by title before unpacking the cartons.  Count the number of copies of each title received and compare to the number on the packing slip/invoice.  Also compare to the number ordered as shown on the PO.  Note any discrepancies in count on the packing slip.  Sign and date the slip and forward to the appropriate accounts payable office.
    If the quantities ordered, shipped and received agree, proceed with labeling and distributing the books.  Discrepancies need to be reported to the publisher or distributor for correction.
    If obvious carton damage (i.e. crushed, torn, wet) is discovered as the shipment is delivered, note the damage on the bill of lading.  This, as well as any hidden damage discovered as skids are broken down later, should be reported to the carrier.
Do not label or stamp any damaged copies discovered during the receiving process.  Set them aside and, when all new copies have been inspected, contact the Customer Service desk of the publisher and arrange replacement, referencing the PO or invoice number.  Damaged copies, including freight, should be replaced at no charge to the school or District.  The publisher will make arrangements for the return of damaged materials at their discretion.
    After distribution, students may discover additional damaged copies (inverted binding, missing pages, excessive glue).  Do not hesitate to report these copies to the publisher, as well.  As long as they are responsible for the damage, they will be willing to replace the copy.

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Weeding:
    Weeding is the process of removing worn, damaged, outdated or otherwise unusable items from the inventory.  As long as there is local need for a title, it should not be weeded from the inventory.  Individual copies, however, may be removed or replaced
at any time.
    If excessive wear or damage causes the weeding of a currently used title to deplete the inventory below required levels, notify the appropriate teacher, department chairperson, budget manager or administrator of the need to reorder additional copies.
    The process of choosing a new title to purchase is called “adoption”.  Periodically for primary texts, these newly adopted titles replace existing inventory.  If time permits, deface the property label in each book before beginning the disposal cycle.  Disposal of the outdated books is a multi-step process and should be completed as follows:

  1. If space permits, retain old copies for one year after replacement so that teachers have an opportunity to select copies for their classroom.
  2. Contact used book wholesalers and offer copies for sale.  They will examine the books in person, pay cash on the spot and remove the books they purchase.  Most books will not be salable because of age or condition.  Sale prices rarely exceed 10% of the book value.
  3. When possible, donate remaining unsold books to foreign or domestic literacy programs, students interested in building their library or teachers at other schools.  Anyone receiving a donation is responsible for the prompt removal of their copies at their cost.
  4. Recycle unwanted books as scrap in accordance with building or district recycling policies.
  5. Dispose of remaining unwanted books as trash.  Contact custodial services for assistance.

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Repair and Conservation:
    The extent to which a collection must be weeded can sometimes be reduced by timely repair or conservation of materials, which can often double the useful life of a book.
    In general, four types of material will complete 90% of required repair:
  1. Reinforce new paperback books with a plastic or vinyl covering.
  2. Reattach loose pages or bindings in any book with polyvinyl acetate (PVA) bookbinder’s glue.
  3. Reinforce cover corners and spines of case bound books with cloth book tape.
  4. Reattach covers to end papers or reinforce spines of paperbacks with 3.5 mil vinyl book tape.

The use of other materials and the degree of restoration attempted is at the discretion of the conservator.
Rebinding severely worn or damaged case bound books can extend their useful life by two to three years.  No book may be rebound more than once and rebinding is never as secure as an original binding.  Therefore, judgment should be exercised before this expense is incurred.
Hardback binding of perfect bound paperback primary texts can also significantly extend their life.  If this is not done as an adjunct activity to the original purchase, the school department using the text is usually saddled with the cost.  Obtain department chair or District authorization before ordering this service.
    Teachers may avail themselves of the repair service for personal copies of books they use in the classroom.

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